Sunday, February 1, 2009

Introduction

Welcome, friends & potential readers! I don't intend to create some kind of fancy mission statement for this blog, but I would like to explain the purpose a bit.

I love to write; thus, I have kept journals & diaries since first or second grade. Once I entered college, I learned about online journals. I started my first at Xanga, and I still have this blog. It is a more personal-made-public journal of my thoughts and daily life. If you are a teacher, you know that most of those tales of daily life might will include education in some way!

Indeed, my blog began follow just such a trend. Tales from the classroom filled my entries, ranging from the mundane this-is-what-I-have-to-grade lists to this-student-got-my-mercury-up. While I know that some people outside the classroom can still enjoy an amusing teacher anecdote, they may not always want to know the cool lesson plans I (or a colleague) used in a certain lesson. Quite frequently, when I come across something that just works - maybe the kids employ upper levels of Bloom's taxonomy, maybe the kids really "got it," or maybe the kids just had fun - I want to share it! I want to claim my bragging rights or relive a wonderful reflection.  As a first year teacher, I was starving for any ideas or strategies that were interesting and effective.  I want to offer what I've found so others need not be as hungry as I.

So, by and large, I established this journal to allow me to comprehensively share ideas, activities, and strategies that worked in my high school English II classroom. I might even talk about things that didn't work, and reflect on changes I would make; however, in general I want this to be an upbeat, positive blog and not one that focuses on my insecurities or frustrations in regards to pedagogy. I hope to attract some fellow teachers - ones I know in real life or ones that just stop in, where we can occasionally discuss questions relevant to our occupation. On that note, feel free to leave comments making suggestions for lessons if you feel so moved! I borrow most of my material from the recommendation & guidance of friends, colleagues, and online sources.

On the topic of sources, I want to offer a disclaimer. I have gleaned ideas from the internet, co-workers, and friends. In general, I can no longer remember what came whence. Some ideas I know for sure are my own, but others I just have no idea. I do not claim everything as my own.  If I don't know where it came from, I can't give proper credit. So I ask that if you know the originator of a piece, please enlighten me, so I can properly credit their work.  I would like this place to be a place to share lessons; if you are ever curious to get any of my hard copies, just speak up.

I will conclude with the quote that inspired the title of this blog. "A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary." (Thomas Carruthers) I have no idea who Thomas Carruthers is.  Regardless, I like this quote. It sums up my ideas and my hopes for my time in the classroom. It is my ultimate goal not merely to teach my students English and proper grammar, but how to think --  analyze, ask why, and take a stand. It is when I am no longer necessary that I know I've done my job.

1 comment:

  1. mmm...
    sounds interesting...

    I'll be a reader..

    :))

    ReplyDelete